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Text Entry in South and Southeast Asian Scripts

หน่วยงาน สำนักงานพัฒนาวิทยาศาสตร์และเทคโนโลยีแห่งชาติ

รายละเอียด

ชื่อเรื่อง : Text Entry in South and Southeast Asian Scripts
นักวิจัย : Renu Gupta , Virach Sornlertamvanich , วิรัช ศรเลิศล้ำวาณิช
คำค้น : Artificial Intelligence and signal and image processing , Computers , Data entry , Electronic data processing , Human-computer interaction , Information, computing and communication sciences , Linguistics (for computational simulation) , Natural language processing (Computer science) , ศูนย์เทคโนโลยีอิเล็กทรอนิกส์และคอมพิวเตอร์แห่งชาติ , สาขาเทคโนโลยีสารสนเทศและนิเทศศาสตร์
หน่วยงาน : สำนักงานพัฒนาวิทยาศาสตร์และเทคโนโลยีแห่งชาติ
ผู้ร่วมงาน : -
ปีพิมพ์ : 2550
อ้างอิง : http://www.nstda.or.th/thairesearch/node/8350
ที่มา : -
ความเชี่ยวชาญ : -
ความสัมพันธ์ : -
ขอบเขตของเนื้อหา : -
บทคัดย่อ/คำอธิบาย :

About 2300 years ago, a script called Brahmi was developed and used in India (Salomon, 1996). Derivatives of this script spread through most of India and, by the 6th century, they had spread to Southeast Asia through trade and Buddhism. All scripts derived from Brahmi are today known as abugidas, and it is at this category of scripts and, in particular, text entry in such that this chapter is directed. Although Brahmi is no longer in use, it is the source of most of the scripts used today in South Asia and Southeast Asia. Many of these languages belong to different language families; for example, Hindi is an Indo-European language, Thai comes from the Thai-Kadai language family, Tibetan belongs to the Sino-Tibetan group, and Khmer is an Austro-Asiatic language. Yet, the scripts used to write them are structurally similar because they are all derived from Brahmi. At the same time, these scripts differ from an alphabetic writing system, not merely in their symbols, but also in their organizing principles. Thus, they present a challenge for text entry through input devices that have been designed primarily for alphabetic writing systems. If we were talking about only a few million users and a few scripts, it may not be worth investing resources in typing these scripts. However, India, with a population of over 1 billion, uses nine scripts from this writing system for administration and education—Bengali (for Bangla and Assamese), Devanagari (for Hindi, Konkani, Marathi, Nepali, and Sanskrit), Gujarati, Gurmukhi (for Punjabi), Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Tamil, and Telugu. In addition, other scripts, such as Modi and Khaithi, are used withintion—Bengali (for Bangla and Assamese), Devanagari (for Hindi, Konkani, Marathi, Nepali, and Sanskrit), Gujarati, Gurmukhi (for Punjabi), Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Tamil, and Telugu. In addition, other scripts, such as Modi and Khaithi, are used within a community. Further, many of the scripts currently used in Asia are structurally similar because they have been derived from Brahmi. Scripts currently in use include the scripts in Sri Lanka (Sinhara), Myanmar, Cambodia (Khmer), Laos (Lao), Thailand (Thai),and Tibet (Tibetan). Related scripts that now have restricted use include the scripts in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Japan. Indonesia has the following related scripts: Javanese, Sundanese, and Madurese on the island of Java; Balinese in Bali; Batak, Lampong, and Redjang in Sumatra; and Buginese and Makassarese in Sulawesi (Kuipers & McDermott, 1996). With the introduction of Bahasa as the national language of Indonesia, most of these scripts now have limited functions but, as the technology for writing them becomes available, interest in these scripts is growing. Other Brahmi-derived scripts that are rarely used now are Cham in Vietnam and Cambodia, Baybayin to write Tagalog in the Philippines, and Siddham in Japan, which is restricted to writing Buddhist scriptures; here, again, there has been renewed interest in these scripts as evidenced both by sites such as Modern Siddham and by attempts to create character sets in Unicode for these scripts. Given this vast pool of users who use scripts with a similar organizing principle, appropriate technology for text input becomes important. In this chapter, we describetext entry devices and techniques used in two Asian countries: India in South Asiaand Thailand in Southeast Asia.

บรรณานุกรม :
Renu Gupta , Virach Sornlertamvanich , วิรัช ศรเลิศล้ำวาณิช . (2550). Text Entry in South and Southeast Asian Scripts.
    ปทุมธานี : สำนักงานพัฒนาวิทยาศาสตร์และเทคโนโลยีแห่งชาติ.
Renu Gupta , Virach Sornlertamvanich , วิรัช ศรเลิศล้ำวาณิช . 2550. "Text Entry in South and Southeast Asian Scripts".
    ปทุมธานี : สำนักงานพัฒนาวิทยาศาสตร์และเทคโนโลยีแห่งชาติ.
Renu Gupta , Virach Sornlertamvanich , วิรัช ศรเลิศล้ำวาณิช . "Text Entry in South and Southeast Asian Scripts."
    ปทุมธานี : สำนักงานพัฒนาวิทยาศาสตร์และเทคโนโลยีแห่งชาติ, 2550. Print.
Renu Gupta , Virach Sornlertamvanich , วิรัช ศรเลิศล้ำวาณิช . Text Entry in South and Southeast Asian Scripts. ปทุมธานี : สำนักงานพัฒนาวิทยาศาสตร์และเทคโนโลยีแห่งชาติ; 2550.